BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:-//TAMU//NONSGML v1.0//EN X-WR-CALNAME:TAMU Events BEGIN:VTIMEZONE TZID:America/Chicago BEGIN:DAYLIGHT TZNAME:CDT DTSTART:20180311T080000 RDATE:20180311T080000 TZOFFSETFROM:-0600 TZOFFSETTO:-0500 END:DAYLIGHT END:VTIMEZONE BEGIN:VTIMEZONE TZID:America/Chicago BEGIN:STANDARD TZNAME:CST DTSTART:20181104T070000 RDATE:20181104T070000 TZOFFSETFROM:-0500 TZOFFSETTO:-0600 END:STANDARD END:VTIMEZONE BEGIN:VTIMEZONE TZID:America/Chicago BEGIN:DAYLIGHT TZNAME:CDT DTSTART:20190310T080000 RDATE:20190310T080000 TZOFFSETFROM:-0600 TZOFFSETTO:-0500 END:DAYLIGHT END:VTIMEZONE BEGIN:VTIMEZONE TZID:America/Chicago BEGIN:STANDARD TZNAME:CST DTSTART:20191103T070000 RDATE:20191103T070000 TZOFFSETFROM:-0500 TZOFFSETTO:-0600 END:STANDARD END:VTIMEZONE BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180912T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180912T140000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Early Modern Studies: Lunch with Dr. Kathryn Santos DESCRIPTION:Early Modern Studies Working GroupLunch and Discussion with Dr. Kathryn SantosDr. Kathryn Santos | Trinity UniversityEvent Description \n Dr. Santos will share an overview and details from a sample chapter of her current book project\, "Babelian Performances: Early Modern Interpreters and the Theatricality of Translation\," in which she argues that early modern English playwrights recognized a special kinship between theatrical performance and the act of interpreting during a period when increasing trade\, travel\, and migration created new occasions for linguistic contact and confusion. As dramatists such as William Shakespeare\, Ben Jonson\, Thomas Heywood\, Thomas Dekker\, and Thomas Middletonexplored the inherent theatricality of these translational activities for purposes of plot and entertainment\, they also illuminated the intersecting discourses of empire\, economics\, gender\, class\, and race that shaped the proto-nationalism of early modern England.   X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Early Modern Studies Working Group
Lunch and Discussion with Dr. Kathryn Santos

Dr. Kathryn Santos | Trinity University

Event Description 
\n Dr. Santos will share an overview and details from a sample chapter of her current book project, "Babelian Performances: Early Modern Interpreters and the Theatricality of Translation," in which she argues that early modern English playwrights recognized a special kinship between theatrical performance and the act of interpreting during a period when increasing trade, travel, and migration created new occasions for linguistic contact and confusion. As dramatists such as William Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, Thomas Heywood, Thomas Dekker, and Thomas Middletonexplored the inherent theatricality of these translational activities for purposes of plot and entertainment, they also illuminated the intersecting discourses of empire, economics, gender, class, and race that shaped the proto-nationalism of early modern England.  \n

UID:20180912T170000Z-45909@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/45909 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T154233Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,216,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:45909 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,216\,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Working Groups X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Damián Robles \; END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180913T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180913T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:War\, Violence & Society WG Kick-Off Social DESCRIPTION:War\, Violence & Society Working Group\n This meeting of the War\, Violence & Society Working Group will be a kick-off social to start the new semester. All are welcome to attend and learn more about this Working Group. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

War, Violence & Society Working Group

\n This meeting of the War, Violence & Society Working Group will be a kick-off social to start the new semester. All are welcome to attend and learn more about this Working Group.\n

UID:20180913T210000Z-46040@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/46040 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T154243Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,216,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:46040 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,216\,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Glasscock Working Group X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Adam Seipp END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180914T123000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180914T140000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Language Matters WG Presentation DESCRIPTION:Language Matters Working Group PresentationTitle\n The Beneficial Effects of Technology-Based Social Reading in L2 ClassesDr. Gabriela Zapata | Department of Hispanic Studies\nDr. Maybel Mesa | Providence CollegeAbstract\n This work investigates the instructional benefits of the digital social reading application eComma for the comprehension and interpretation of authentic texts in intermediate second language (L2) Spanish classes in a university in the Southern United States. The study examines 44 students' collaborative work on two poems connected to the themes of the class's instructional units. Data are based on the analysis of the participants' digital annotations\, and responses to a survey that probed into their opinions of eComma. The results show a similar number of student-generated comments on either lexical queries or contextual interpretations in both poems. However\, there were differences in the kind of annotations that originated in each text. In addition\, the findings suggest that working with eComma allowed students to develop their L2 reading performance\, and it resulted in their collaborative construction of knowledge\, which might have facilitated their interpretation process. In the survey responses\, the participants identified various social and instructional benefits\, even though they also reported some technical difficulties. Overall\, the study mirrors the positive results reported in previous work\, and it points to the effectiveness eComma for the implementation of the kind of comprehensive L2 practices currently recommended in the field of L2 pedagogy.Keywords: Digital social reading\, eComma\, performance\, interpretive mode\, collaborative construction of knowledge\, L2 Spanish university students\n\n  \n\n I hope you will all come and join us for this exciting talk. There will be bagels and other goodies to accompany the intellectual nourishment. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Language Matters Working Group Presentation

Title
\n The Beneficial Effects of Technology-Based Social Reading in L2 Classes

Dr. Gabriela Zapata | Department of Hispanic Studies\n

Dr. Maybel Mesa | Providence College

Abstract
\n This work investigates the instructional benefits of the digital social reading application eComma for the comprehension and interpretation of authentic texts in intermediate second language (L2) Spanish classes in a university in the Southern United States. The study examines 44 students' collaborative work on two poems connected to the themes of the class's instructional units. Data are based on the analysis of the participants' digital annotations, and responses to a survey that probed into their opinions of eComma. The results show a similar number of student-generated comments on either lexical queries or contextual interpretations in both poems. However, there were differences in the kind of annotations that originated in each text. In addition, the findings suggest that working with eComma allowed students to develop their L2 reading performance, and it resulted in their collaborative construction of knowledge, which might have facilitated their interpretation process. In the survey responses, the participants identified various social and instructional benefits, even though they also reported some technical difficulties. Overall, the study mirrors the positive results reported in previous work, and it points to the effectiveness eComma for the implementation of the kind of comprehensive L2 practices currently recommended in the field of L2 pedagogy.

Keywords: Digital social reading, eComma, performance, interpretive mode, collaborative construction of knowledge, L2 Spanish university students\n

\n  \n

\n I hope you will all come and join us for this exciting talk. There will be bagels and other goodies to accompany the intellectual nourishment.\n

UID:20180914T173000Z-46041@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/46041 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T171039Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,216,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:46041 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,216\,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Glasscock Center Working Groups X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Maria Moyna END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180917T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180917T170000 LOCATION:Langford Architecture Center Building A GEO:30.618804;-96.337639 SUMMARY:Campus Walking Tour with PACSS DESCRIPTION:This will be a series of student-led\, open-to-the-public walking tours across the main campus of Texas A&M University\, with pre-defined route\, stops\, and talking points. We will give four one-hour tours\, each of the same content\, with 20-25 participants each tour\, once per week from mid-September to mid-October\, 2018. Two tours are scheduled in the morning\, and the other two are in the afternoon. The tours will be mostly conducted outdoor\, with 1 or 2 stops indoor. Walking and oral communication will be the primary format. We will provide assistance for participants requesting ADA accommodations.\n  \n The tour will start outside of Langford Architecture Center\, with 5 stops at Scoates Hall\, Teague Center\, Halbouty Building\, Sbisa Dining Hall\, Clements Hall\, and ends at Hullabaloo Hall lobby. At the beginning of the tour\, we will introduce the tour leaders\, announce the format\, route\, and purpose of our event. We will orally communicate our content\, and take questions along the way. At the end of the tour\, we will do a brief discussion/reflection of what we learned in the process\, hand out and collect written feedback forms\, and distribute souvenirs for the participants.\n\n This walking tour series is supported by a Glasscock Cultural Enrichment and Campus Diversity Grant.\n\n Our presenters are members of the Preservation and Conservation Student Society (PACSS). We are full-time students from the College of Architecture with a wide range of academic interests. We have sufficient knowledge of campus history and culture\, as well as a shared passion and devotion to promote a diverse and inclusive campus climate. The peer education nature of our tours will have strong and positive impacts on participants who are new students.\n  \n As presenters\, we are a reflection of the diversity of campus. We came from different states of the U.S. (California\, Ohio) and different countries around the world (Peru\, Guatemala\, India\, China\, Czech Republic). Each of us has extensive studying or living abroad experience. We are very aware of the cultural shocks and struggles that comes with a lack of sense of belonging\, commonly experienced by our new students\, in particular\, students of minority backgrounds. Through studying\, teaching\, and service activities at A&M\, we have built our knowledge and skills of working with a diverse audience\, including first-generation students\, non-traditional students\, international students\, and students with disabilities.\n  \n Our awareness and willingness to address the issues related to diversity and inclusion on campus\, make us active members of the community. We hope that through our leadership and participation in this event series\, more people from diverse background\, especially the traditionally marginalized groups in higher education\, will start to take part in the conversations on campus climate\, and help enrich our Aggie experience to be more diverse and inclusive. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n This will be a series of student-led, open-to-the-public walking tours across the main campus of Texas A&M University, with pre-defined route, stops, and talking points. We will give four one-hour tours, each of the same content, with 20-25 participants each tour, once per week from mid-September to mid-October, 2018. Two tours are scheduled in the morning, and the other two are in the afternoon. The tours will be mostly conducted outdoor, with 1 or 2 stops indoor. Walking and oral communication will be the primary format. We will provide assistance for participants requesting ADA accommodations.
\n  
\n The tour will start outside of Langford Architecture Center, with 5 stops at Scoates Hall, Teague Center, Halbouty Building, Sbisa Dining Hall, Clements Hall, and ends at Hullabaloo Hall lobby. At the beginning of the tour, we will introduce the tour leaders, announce the format, route, and purpose of our event. We will orally communicate our content, and take questions along the way. At the end of the tour, we will do a brief discussion/reflection of what we learned in the process, hand out and collect written feedback forms, and distribute souvenirs for the participants.\n

\n This walking tour series is supported by a Glasscock Cultural Enrichment and Campus Diversity Grant.\n


\n Our presenters are members of the Preservation and Conservation Student Society (PACSS). We are full-time students from the College of Architecture with a wide range of academic interests. We have sufficient knowledge of campus history and culture, as well as a shared passion and devotion to promote a diverse and inclusive campus climate. The peer education nature of our tours will have strong and positive impacts on participants who are new students.
\n  
\n As presenters, we are a reflection of the diversity of campus. We came from different states of the U.S. (California, Ohio) and different countries around the world (Peru, Guatemala, India, China, Czech Republic). Each of us has extensive studying or living abroad experience. We are very aware of the cultural shocks and struggles that comes with a lack of sense of belonging, commonly experienced by our new students, in particular, students of minority backgrounds. Through studying, teaching, and service activities at A&M, we have built our knowledge and skills of working with a diverse audience, including first-generation students, non-traditional students, international students, and students with disabilities.
\n  
\n Our awareness and willingness to address the issues related to diversity and inclusion on campus, make us active members of the community. We hope that through our leadership and participation in this event series, more people from diverse background, especially the traditionally marginalized groups in higher education, will start to take part in the conversations on campus climate, and help enrich our Aggie experience to be more diverse and inclusive.\n

UID:20180917T210000Z-44071@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44071 LAST-MODIFIED:20180820T153409Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44071 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, contact Ben Baaske. END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180918T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180918T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Graduate Colloquium Series: "Community Museum's Impacts on Tourism and Historic Preservation - Case Study from Shijia Hutong Museum in Beijing\, China" DESCRIPTION:Mingqian Liu  | Ph.D. candidate\, Department of Architecture\n\n  \n"Community Museum's Impacts on Tourism and Historic Preservation - Case Study from Shijia Hutong Museum in Beijing\, China"\n  \nAbstract: \n The preservation of Beijing's historic residential neighborhoods is facing significant challenges brought by urban regeneration and real estate development. The establishment of community museum as both a tourist site for visitors and a civic center for the community is still a new concept in the 21st century China. Shijia Hutong Museum was the first of its kind in Beijing\, built as part of the neighborhood conservation-planning project to promote hutong culture and heritage protection. Based on literature review\, participant observation\, and stakeholder interviews\, this study examines the socio-cultural\, political\, and economic impacts of the museum on tourism and historic preservation\, aiming to analyze its influence on local residents\, tourists\, government\, and other stakeholders that were involved in the museum's founding and operation process.\n\n  \nBiographyMingqian Liu is a PhD candidate and teaching assistant from the Department of Architecture. She is also completing a graduate certificate in Historic Preservation. She is bilingual in Mandarin Chinese and English. Her research interests include architectural and urban history\, historic preservation\, heritage tourism\, and public education in museums. Her dissertation focuses on the public perceptions of historic preservation policies and practices in Beijing's historic and cultural conservation areas since the 1990s. With the support of Glasscock Graduate Research Fellowship\, she is conducting field surveys and interviews with long-term residents in Dongsi neighborhood to learn their values\, motivations\, and needs through historic preservation. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Mingqian Liu  | Ph.D. candidate, Department of Architecture\n

\n  \n

"Community Museum's Impacts on Tourism and Historic Preservation - Case Study from Shijia Hutong Museum in Beijing, China"

\n  \n

Abstract: 

\n The preservation of Beijing's historic residential neighborhoods is facing significant challenges brought by urban regeneration and real estate development. The establishment of community museum as both a tourist site for visitors and a civic center for the community is still a new concept in the 21st century China. Shijia Hutong Museum was the first of its kind in Beijing, built as part of the neighborhood conservation-planning project to promote hutong culture and heritage protection. Based on literature review, participant observation, and stakeholder interviews, this study examines the socio-cultural, political, and economic impacts of the museum on tourism and historic preservation, aiming to analyze its influence on local residents, tourists, government, and other stakeholders that were involved in the museum's founding and operation process.\n

\n  \n

Biography
Mingqian Liu is a PhD candidate and teaching assistant from the Department of Architecture. She is also completing a graduate certificate in Historic Preservation. She is bilingual in Mandarin Chinese and English. Her research interests include architectural and urban history, historic preservation, heritage tourism, and public education in museums. Her dissertation focuses on the public perceptions of historic preservation policies and practices in Beijing's historic and cultural conservation areas since the 1990s. With the support of Glasscock Graduate Research Fellowship, she is conducting field surveys and interviews with long-term residents in Dongsi neighborhood to learn their values, motivations, and needs through historic preservation.\n

UID:20180918T210000Z-44456@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44456 LAST-MODIFIED:20180903T211654Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,275,255/3247_Mingqian_Liu.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44456 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,275\,255/3247_Mingqian_Liu.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Mingqian Liu END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180920T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180920T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:War\, Violence\, and Society Working Group DESCRIPTION:Brian Linn Paper Discussion X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n Brian Linn Paper Discussion\n

UID:20180920T210000Z-46153@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/46153 LAST-MODIFIED:20180905T153946Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,216,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:46153 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,216\,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:image X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, please contact Adam Seipp END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180925T100000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180925T110000 LOCATION:Langford Architecture Center Building A GEO:30.618804;-96.337639 SUMMARY:Campus Walking Tour with PACSS DESCRIPTION:This will be a series of student-led\, open-to-the-public walking tours across the main campus of Texas A&M University\, with pre-defined route\, stops\, and talking points. We will give four one-hour tours\, each of the same content\, with 20-25 participants each tour\, once per week from mid-September to mid-October\, 2018. Two tours are scheduled in the morning\, and the other two are in the afternoon. The tours will be mostly conducted outdoor\, with 1 or 2 stops indoor. Walking and oral communication will be the primary format. We will provide assistance for participants requesting ADA accommodations.\n  \n The tour will start outside of Langford Architecture Center\, with 5 stops at Scoates Hall\, Teague Center\, Halbouty Building\, Sbisa Dining Hall\, Clements Hall\, and ends at Hullabaloo Hall lobby. At the beginning of the tour\, we will introduce the tour leaders\, announce the format\, route\, and purpose of our event. We will orally communicate our content\, and take questions along the way. At the end of the tour\, we will do a brief discussion/reflection of what we learned in the process\, hand out and collect written feedback forms\, and distribute souvenirs for the participants.\n\n This walking tour series is supported by a Glasscock Cultural Enrichment and Campus Diversity Grant.\n\n Our presenters are members of the Preservation and Conservation Student Society (PACSS). We are full-time students from the College of Architecture with a wide range of academic interests. We have sufficient knowledge of campus history and culture\, as well as a shared passion and devotion to promote a diverse and inclusive campus climate. The peer education nature of our tours will have strong and positive impacts on participants who are new students.\n  \n As presenters\, we are a reflection of the diversity of campus. We came from different states of the U.S. (California\, Ohio) and different countries around the world (Peru\, Guatemala\, India\, China\, Czech Republic). Each of us has extensive studying or living abroad experience. We are very aware of the cultural shocks and struggles that comes with a lack of sense of belonging\, commonly experienced by our new students\, in particular\, students of minority backgrounds. Through studying\, teaching\, and service activities at A&M\, we have built our knowledge and skills of working with a diverse audience\, including first-generation students\, non-traditional students\, international students\, and students with disabilities.\n  \n Our awareness and willingness to address the issues related to diversity and inclusion on campus\, make us active members of the community. We hope that through our leadership and participation in this event series\, more people from diverse background\, especially the traditionally marginalized groups in higher education\, will start to take part in the conversations on campus climate\, and help enrich our Aggie experience to be more diverse and inclusive. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n This will be a series of student-led, open-to-the-public walking tours across the main campus of Texas A&M University, with pre-defined route, stops, and talking points. We will give four one-hour tours, each of the same content, with 20-25 participants each tour, once per week from mid-September to mid-October, 2018. Two tours are scheduled in the morning, and the other two are in the afternoon. The tours will be mostly conducted outdoor, with 1 or 2 stops indoor. Walking and oral communication will be the primary format. We will provide assistance for participants requesting ADA accommodations.
\n  
\n The tour will start outside of Langford Architecture Center, with 5 stops at Scoates Hall, Teague Center, Halbouty Building, Sbisa Dining Hall, Clements Hall, and ends at Hullabaloo Hall lobby. At the beginning of the tour, we will introduce the tour leaders, announce the format, route, and purpose of our event. We will orally communicate our content, and take questions along the way. At the end of the tour, we will do a brief discussion/reflection of what we learned in the process, hand out and collect written feedback forms, and distribute souvenirs for the participants.\n

\n This walking tour series is supported by a Glasscock Cultural Enrichment and Campus Diversity Grant.\n


\n Our presenters are members of the Preservation and Conservation Student Society (PACSS). We are full-time students from the College of Architecture with a wide range of academic interests. We have sufficient knowledge of campus history and culture, as well as a shared passion and devotion to promote a diverse and inclusive campus climate. The peer education nature of our tours will have strong and positive impacts on participants who are new students.
\n  
\n As presenters, we are a reflection of the diversity of campus. We came from different states of the U.S. (California, Ohio) and different countries around the world (Peru, Guatemala, India, China, Czech Republic). Each of us has extensive studying or living abroad experience. We are very aware of the cultural shocks and struggles that comes with a lack of sense of belonging, commonly experienced by our new students, in particular, students of minority backgrounds. Through studying, teaching, and service activities at A&M, we have built our knowledge and skills of working with a diverse audience, including first-generation students, non-traditional students, international students, and students with disabilities.
\n  
\n Our awareness and willingness to address the issues related to diversity and inclusion on campus, make us active members of the community. We hope that through our leadership and participation in this event series, more people from diverse background, especially the traditionally marginalized groups in higher education, will start to take part in the conversations on campus climate, and help enrich our Aggie experience to be more diverse and inclusive.\n

UID:20180925T150000Z-44072@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44072 LAST-MODIFIED:20180820T153421Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44072 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, contact Ben Baaske. END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180925T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180925T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Faculty Colloquium Series DESCRIPTION:Emily Johansen | Department of English X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Emily Johansen | Department of English\n

UID:20180925T210000Z-44472@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44472 LAST-MODIFIED:20180626T203950Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,195,195/3075_Johansen.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44472 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,195\,195/3075_Johansen.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Emily Johansen X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180927T100000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180927T110000 LOCATION:Liberal Arts and Arts &\; Humanities Building GEO:30.617684;-96.337971 SUMMARY:"Mapping Medical Tokyo" DESCRIPTION:Dr. Susan L. Burns | Chair of the Center for East Asian Studies\, University of Chicago\n\n Dr. Susan L. Burns is a foremost authority in the history of body in Japan\, known for her use of diverse methodologies of gender studies\, legal studies\, and digital humanities in her research.\n\n In her talk\, "Mapping Medical Tokyo\," Dr. Burns will present on how she uses Arc-Gis technology to explore the relationship between the cityscape of late 19th century Tokyo and new medical institutions.\n\n This lecture is supported by a Glasscock Notable Lecture Grant and the Center of Digital Humanities Research. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Dr. Susan L. Burns | Chair of the Center for East Asian Studies, University of Chicago\n

\n Dr. Susan L. Burns is a foremost authority in the history of body in Japan, known for her use of diverse methodologies of gender studies, legal studies, and digital humanities in her research.\n

\n In her talk, "Mapping Medical Tokyo," Dr. Burns will present on how she uses Arc-Gis technology to explore the relationship between the cityscape of late 19th century Tokyo and new medical institutions.\n

\n This lecture is supported by a Glasscock Notable Lecture Grant and the Center of Digital Humanities Research.\n

UID:20180927T150000Z-45432@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/45432 LAST-MODIFIED:20180907T154934Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:45432 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Dr. Hoi-eun Kim. X-LIVEWHALE-SUMMARY:Notable Lecture END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180927T100000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180927T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Latinx Identities & Civil Rights: Symposium UID:20180927T150000Z-45431@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/45431 LAST-MODIFIED:20180820T144104Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:45431 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180927T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180927T170000 LOCATION:Liberal Arts and Arts &\; Humanities Building GEO:30.617684;-96.337971 SUMMARY:"Human Rights\, Biological Citizenship\, and Reproductive Policy in Japan's Leprosy Sanitaria" DESCRIPTION:Dr. Susan L. Burns | Chair of the Center for East Asian Studies\, University of Chicago\n\n Dr. Susan L. Burns\, Chair of the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Chicago\, is a leading historian of Japan\, whose long view of history identifying continuities and ruptures between the 'pre-modern' and 'modern' eras has fundamentally reshaped scholarly understanding of Japan's modern transformation.\n\n In her lecture\, "Human Rights\, Biological Citizenship\, and Reproductive Policy in Japan's Leprosy Sanitaria\," Dr. Burns explores the process through which leprosy\, as a stigmatized disease\, functioned as an object of intense debate on the contested boundary of citizenship within the Japanese nation.\n\n This lecture is supported by a Glasscock Notable Lecture Grant and the Center of Digital Humanities Research. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Dr. Susan L. Burns | Chair of the Center for East Asian Studies, University of Chicago\n

\n Dr. Susan L. Burns, Chair of the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Chicago, is a leading historian of Japan, whose long view of history identifying continuities and ruptures between the 'pre-modern' and 'modern' eras has fundamentally reshaped scholarly understanding of Japan's modern transformation.\n

\n In her lecture, "Human Rights, Biological Citizenship, and Reproductive Policy in Japan's Leprosy Sanitaria," Dr. Burns explores the process through which leprosy, as a stigmatized disease, functioned as an object of intense debate on the contested boundary of citizenship within the Japanese nation.\n

\n This lecture is supported by a Glasscock Notable Lecture Grant and the Center of Digital Humanities Research.\n

UID:20180927T210000Z-44076@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44076 LAST-MODIFIED:20180907T154907Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44076 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, contact Dr. Hoi-eun Kim. X-LIVEWHALE-SUMMARY:Notable Lecture END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20180928T083000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20180928T160000 LOCATION:Memorial Student Center GEO:30.612308;-96.341388 SUMMARY:Media Literacy and Civic Engagement in a Digital World DESCRIPTION:The National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE) and Texas A&M University are collaborating on this day-long symposium on media literacy and civic engagement. This symposium is a part of a series of honest\, constructive dialogues hosted by NAMLE across the country with students\, educators\, content creators\, and the public. The goal is to create a much-needed national conversation on the importance of media literacy and its essential role in today's world. Some questions we will discuss at the event are:\nWhat are the challenges that educators face in the ever-growing information landscape? And\, what are some possible solutions to overcome these challenges?\n What do we need to know and understand to become active and engaged citizens?\n Can effective media literacy education restore trust in the media?\n How do we define the future of media literacy education? X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n The National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE) and Texas A&M University are collaborating on this day-long symposium on media literacy and civic engagement. This symposium is a part of a series of honest, constructive dialogues hosted by NAMLE across the country with students, educators, content creators, and the public. The goal is to create a much-needed national conversation on the importance of media literacy and its essential role in today's world. Some questions we will discuss at the event are:\n

UID:20180928T133000Z-44070@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44070 LAST-MODIFIED:20180820T164023Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44070 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, contact Dr. Srivi Ramasubramanian. END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181001T123000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181001T140000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Medieval Studies Working Group Meeting DESCRIPTION:Medieval Studies Working Group\n Meeting 1 of 3\, Fall 2018\n\n The Medieval Studies Working Group invites the participation of all faculty and graduate students with academic interests in the Middle Ages\, roughly defined as the period 500-1500 CE. Regular meetings normally focus on the airing of work-in-progress or the discussion of published primary or secondary works. The group provides a forum for dialogue about the field of medieval studies and any topic within it\; supports participants' own research with opportunities for constructive feedback\; increases awareness of\, and access to\, interdisciplinary possibilities as we benefit mutually from one another's more specialized interests and expertise\; and continues to develop a sense of community among TAMU's medievalists.\n Convenors: Kathy Torabi\, Noah Peterson\, Caitlin Brenner\, English X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Medieval Studies Working Group

\n Meeting 1 of 3, Fall 2018\n

\n The Medieval Studies Working Group invites the participation of all faculty and graduate students with academic interests in the Middle Ages, roughly defined as the period 500-1500 CE. Regular meetings normally focus on the airing of work-in-progress or the discussion of published primary or secondary works. The group provides a forum for dialogue about the field of medieval studies and any topic within it; supports participants' own research with opportunities for constructive feedback; increases awareness of, and access to, interdisciplinary possibilities as we benefit mutually from one another's more specialized interests and expertise; and continues to develop a sense of community among TAMU's medievalists.
\n Convenors: Kathy Torabi, Noah Peterson, Caitlin Brenner, English

UID:20181001T173000Z-46261@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/46261 LAST-MODIFIED:20180907T162949Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,216,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:46261 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,216\,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Working Groups X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Katayoun Torabi
Noah Peterson END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181002T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181002T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Graduate Colloquium Series: Hurman DESCRIPTION:Hazal Hurman | Ph.D. candidate\, Department of Sociology X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Hazal Hurman | Ph.D. candidate, Department of Sociology\n

UID:20181002T210000Z-44457@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44457 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T161655Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/13,0,360,347/3248_book_edges_circular.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44457 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/13\,0\,360\,347/3248_book_edges_circular.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Graduate Colloquium: Hazal Hurman END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181003T090000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181003T100000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Morning Coffee Hour DESCRIPTION:Carmela Garritano | Associate Professor\, Africana Studies and Film Studies programs\nTitle\n "Uranium Extraction and Electrified Imaginaries: Putting African Cinema in Conversation with Energy Humanities"\n\n  \n\n During her Glasscock Internal Fellowship semester\, Carmela Garritano worked on two chapters of her current book project\, which draws on the methods of Energy Humanities to investigate the energy activism and imaginaries of recent African film and screen media. In Resource Extraction and Temporalities of Waiting in Idrissou Mora Kpai's Arlit\, Deuxième Paris\, she attend to the formal expression of waiting in Kpai's poetic documentary. Set in Arlit\, Niger\, a small town simultaneously dependent on and devastated by uranium mining\, the documentary exploits cinematic duration and distance —two features associated with so-called slow cinema—to represent the experiential dimensions of waiting imposed by the global economics of resource extraction in Africa. A second chapter of this project\, tentatively called Electrifying Movies in Tamale\, Ghana: Exhibition\, Electrification\, and the Temporal Time Lags of Modernity\, examines an emergent cluster of video production and exhibition in Tamale\, Ghana in relation to the country's National Electrification Program (NEP) and the subsequent Self Help Electrification Program (SHEP). Here\, she is interested describing the kinds of cultural production that materialize in the technological time lags produced by modernity's advance. She also describe the energy unconscious of the Dagbani-language videos produced in Tamale\; using the feature Piele as an example\, I attempt to read electricity as it marks the form and narrative of the movie. During my coffee hour\, she plans to share clips and slides from these films and share a few observations and questions about the larger project. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Carmela Garritano | Associate Professor, Africana Studies and Film Studies programs\n

Title
\n "Uranium Extraction and Electrified Imaginaries: Putting African Cinema in Conversation with Energy Humanities"\n

\n  \n

\n During her Glasscock Internal Fellowship semester, Carmela Garritano worked on two chapters of her current book project, which draws on the methods of Energy Humanities to investigate the energy activism and imaginaries of recent African film and screen media. In Resource Extraction and Temporalities of Waiting in Idrissou Mora Kpai's Arlit, Deuxième Paris, she attend to the formal expression of waiting in Kpai's poetic documentary. Set in Arlit, Niger, a small town simultaneously dependent on and devastated by uranium mining, the documentary exploits cinematic duration and distance —two features associated with so-called slow cinema—to represent the experiential dimensions of waiting imposed by the global economics of resource extraction in Africa. A second chapter of this project, tentatively called Electrifying Movies in Tamale, Ghana: Exhibition, Electrification, and the Temporal Time Lags of Modernity, examines an emergent cluster of video production and exhibition in Tamale, Ghana in relation to the country's National Electrification Program (NEP) and the subsequent Self Help Electrification Program (SHEP). Here, she is interested describing the kinds of cultural production that materialize in the technological time lags produced by modernity's advance. She also describe the energy unconscious of the Dagbani-language videos produced in Tamale; using the feature Piele as an example, I attempt to read electricity as it marks the form and narrative of the movie. During my coffee hour, she plans to share clips and slides from these films and share a few observations and questions about the larger project.\n

UID:20181003T140000Z-44558@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44558 LAST-MODIFIED:20180910T155655Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/69,84,584,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44558 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/69\,84\,584\,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:MCH X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181003T100000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181003T110000 LOCATION:Langford Architecture Center Building A GEO:30.618804;-96.337639 SUMMARY:Campus Walking Tour with PACSS DESCRIPTION:This will be a series of student-led\, open-to-the-public walking tours across the main campus of Texas A&M University\, with pre-defined route\, stops\, and talking points. We will give four one-hour tours\, each of the same content\, with 20-25 participants each tour\, once per week from mid-September to mid-October\, 2018. Two tours are scheduled in the morning\, and the other two are in the afternoon. The tours will be mostly conducted outdoor\, with 1 or 2 stops indoor. Walking and oral communication will be the primary format. We will provide assistance for participants requesting ADA accommodations.\n  \n The tour will start outside of Langford Architecture Center\, with 5 stops at Scoates Hall\, Teague Center\, Halbouty Building\, Sbisa Dining Hall\, Clements Hall\, and ends at Hullabaloo Hall lobby. At the beginning of the tour\, we will introduce the tour leaders\, announce the format\, route\, and purpose of our event. We will orally communicate our content\, and take questions along the way. At the end of the tour\, we will do a brief discussion/reflection of what we learned in the process\, hand out and collect written feedback forms\, and distribute souvenirs for the participants.\n  \n This initial series will be a pilot project to see what works and doesn't work\, so we can modify the content and format later. Upon completion of the initial tours\, PACSS will work together with various offices and departments on campus to develop multiple versions of the walking tours\, and build this into more sustainable and consistent events in the future. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n This will be a series of student-led, open-to-the-public walking tours across the main campus of Texas A&M University, with pre-defined route, stops, and talking points. We will give four one-hour tours, each of the same content, with 20-25 participants each tour, once per week from mid-September to mid-October, 2018. Two tours are scheduled in the morning, and the other two are in the afternoon. The tours will be mostly conducted outdoor, with 1 or 2 stops indoor. Walking and oral communication will be the primary format. We will provide assistance for participants requesting ADA accommodations.
\n  
\n The tour will start outside of Langford Architecture Center, with 5 stops at Scoates Hall, Teague Center, Halbouty Building, Sbisa Dining Hall, Clements Hall, and ends at Hullabaloo Hall lobby. At the beginning of the tour, we will introduce the tour leaders, announce the format, route, and purpose of our event. We will orally communicate our content, and take questions along the way. At the end of the tour, we will do a brief discussion/reflection of what we learned in the process, hand out and collect written feedback forms, and distribute souvenirs for the participants.
\n  
\n This initial series will be a pilot project to see what works and doesn't work, so we can modify the content and format later. Upon completion of the initial tours, PACSS will work together with various offices and departments on campus to develop multiple versions of the walking tours, and build this into more sustainable and consistent events in the future.\n

UID:20181003T150000Z-44073@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44073 LAST-MODIFIED:20180529T161829Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44073 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, contact Ben Baaske. END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181009T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181009T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Faculty Colloquium Series: Hinojosa DESCRIPTION:Felipe Hinojosa | Department of History X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Felipe Hinojosa | Department of History\n

UID:20181009T210000Z-44473@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44473 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T161920Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,360,353/3249_Headshot.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44473 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,360\,353/3249_Headshot.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Dr. Felipe Hinojosa X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181011T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181011T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:War\, Violence\, and Society Working Group Meeting DESCRIPTION:Adam Seipp Paper Discussion X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n Adam Seipp Paper Discussion\n

UID:20181011T210000Z-46151@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/46151 LAST-MODIFIED:20180905T154023Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,216,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:46151 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,216\,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:image X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, please contact \;Adam Seipp END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181011T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181011T170000 LOCATION:Langford Architecture Center Building A GEO:30.618804;-96.337639 SUMMARY:Campus Walking Tour with PACSS DESCRIPTION:This will be a series of student-led\, open-to-the-public walking tours across the main campus of Texas A&M University\, with pre-defined route\, stops\, and talking points. We will give four one-hour tours\, each of the same content\, with 20-25 participants each tour\, once per week from mid-September to mid-October\, 2018. Two tours are scheduled in the morning\, and the other two are in the afternoon. The tours will be mostly conducted outdoor\, with 1 or 2 stops indoor. Walking and oral communication will be the primary format. We will provide assistance for participants requesting ADA accommodations.\n  \n The tour will start outside of Langford Architecture Center\, with 5 stops at Scoates Hall\, Teague Center\, Halbouty Building\, Sbisa Dining Hall\, Clements Hall\, and ends at Hullabaloo Hall lobby. At the beginning of the tour\, we will introduce the tour leaders\, announce the format\, route\, and purpose of our event. We will orally communicate our content\, and take questions along the way. At the end of the tour\, we will do a brief discussion/reflection of what we learned in the process\, hand out and collect written feedback forms\, and distribute souvenirs for the participants.\n  \n This initial series will be a pilot project to see what works and doesn't work\, so we can modify the content and format later. Upon completion of the initial tours\, PACSS will work together with various offices and departments on campus to develop multiple versions of the walking tours\, and build this into more sustainable and consistent events in the future. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n This will be a series of student-led, open-to-the-public walking tours across the main campus of Texas A&M University, with pre-defined route, stops, and talking points. We will give four one-hour tours, each of the same content, with 20-25 participants each tour, once per week from mid-September to mid-October, 2018. Two tours are scheduled in the morning, and the other two are in the afternoon. The tours will be mostly conducted outdoor, with 1 or 2 stops indoor. Walking and oral communication will be the primary format. We will provide assistance for participants requesting ADA accommodations.
\n  
\n The tour will start outside of Langford Architecture Center, with 5 stops at Scoates Hall, Teague Center, Halbouty Building, Sbisa Dining Hall, Clements Hall, and ends at Hullabaloo Hall lobby. At the beginning of the tour, we will introduce the tour leaders, announce the format, route, and purpose of our event. We will orally communicate our content, and take questions along the way. At the end of the tour, we will do a brief discussion/reflection of what we learned in the process, hand out and collect written feedback forms, and distribute souvenirs for the participants.
\n  
\n This initial series will be a pilot project to see what works and doesn't work, so we can modify the content and format later. Upon completion of the initial tours, PACSS will work together with various offices and departments on campus to develop multiple versions of the walking tours, and build this into more sustainable and consistent events in the future.\n

UID:20181011T210000Z-44074@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44074 LAST-MODIFIED:20180529T161855Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44074 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, contact Ben Baaske. END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181016T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181016T160000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Graduate Colloquium Series: Weidemann DESCRIPTION:Erika Weidemann | Ph.D. candidate\, Department of History\nTitle\n From Chortitza to Canada and the United States: The Post-World War II Immigration of Ethnic Germans\nAbstractEthnic German immigration in the post-World War II era illustrates how organizations facilitated networks and influenced immigration patterns. Villagers from Chortitza\, an ethnic German settlement located along the Dnieper River in Ukraine\, demonstrates this trend. During World War II\, villagers were at times both refugees and resettlers. After the war ended\, most Mennonites from Chortitza immigrated to Canada whereas Chortitzans of other faiths predominantly immigrated to the United States. The explanation for this divide lies with organizations that directed immigrants to their destinations. The Mennonite Central Committee\, Church World Service\, and Lutheran World Federation were instrumental in lobbying governments\, advocating for specific identities\, and finding sponsors. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Erika Weidemann | Ph.D. candidate, Department of History\n

Title
\n From Chortitza to Canada and the United States: The Post-World War II Immigration of Ethnic Germans\n

Abstract
Ethnic German immigration in the post-World War II era illustrates how organizations facilitated networks and influenced immigration patterns. Villagers from Chortitza, an ethnic German settlement located along the Dnieper River in Ukraine, demonstrates this trend. During World War II, villagers were at times both refugees and resettlers. After the war ended, most Mennonites from Chortitza immigrated to Canada whereas Chortitzans of other faiths predominantly immigrated to the United States. The explanation for this divide lies with organizations that directed immigrants to their destinations. The Mennonite Central Committee, Church World Service, and Lutheran World Federation were instrumental in lobbying governments, advocating for specific identities, and finding sponsors.\n

UID:20181016T210000Z-44458@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44458 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T162037Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,453,456/3250_Weidemann_headshot.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44458 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,453\,456/3250_Weidemann_headshot.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Erika Weidemann END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181017T090000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181017T100000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Morning Coffee Hour DESCRIPTION:Cara Wallis | Associate Professor\, Department of CommunicationTitle\n "Social Media and the Ordinary: Affect\, Aspiration\, and Transformation in Contemporary China"\n\n In this informal talk\, Cara Wallis will present her research over the past four years: an expansive study of social media use in China through four case studies: (1) the affective dimensions of communicative empowerment among a group of middle-aged female domestic workers involved with an NGO-sponsored drama club in Beijing\; (2) how uses of technology for economic production become the site for the reproduction and/or reconfiguration of gender hierarchies in rural China\; (3) how a diverse group of young creatives who have migrated to Beijing use social media for informal learning\, social networking\, and curating their creative\, yet precarious lives\; and (4) how young feminists (and others interested in feminism) use social media to resist misogynist discourses and practices. These processes and practices speak to larger social\, economic\, and cultural transformations taking place in China. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Cara Wallis | Associate Professor, Department of Communication

Title
\n "Social Media and the Ordinary: Affect, Aspiration, and Transformation in Contemporary China"\n

\n In this informal talk, Cara Wallis will present her research over the past four years: an expansive study of social media use in China through four case studies: (1) the affective dimensions of communicative empowerment among a group of middle-aged female domestic workers involved with an NGO-sponsored drama club in Beijing; (2) how uses of technology for economic production become the site for the reproduction and/or reconfiguration of gender hierarchies in rural China; (3) how a diverse group of young creatives who have migrated to Beijing use social media for informal learning, social networking, and curating their creative, yet precarious lives; and (4) how young feminists (and others interested in feminism) use social media to resist misogynist discourses and practices. These processes and practices speak to larger social, economic, and cultural transformations taking place in China.\n

UID:20181017T140000Z-44604@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44604 LAST-MODIFIED:20180910T155230Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/77,84,592,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44604 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/77\,84\,592\,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:MCH X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181023T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181023T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Faculty Colloquium Series DESCRIPTION:Vanita Reddy | Department of English X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Vanita Reddy | Department of English

UID:20181023T210000Z-44474@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44474 LAST-MODIFIED:20180626T204526Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,195,195/3076_Reddy.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44474 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,195\,195/3076_Reddy.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Vanita Reddy X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181024T153000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181024T173000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Lecture: Media Representations of Sikh-Americans\, Islamophobia and Racialized Violence DESCRIPTION:Dr. Srividya Ramasubramanian | Department of Communication\nTitle"Media Representations of Sikh-Americans\, Islamophobia and Racialized Violence" X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Dr. Srividya Ramasubramanian | Department of Communication\n

Title
"Media Representations of Sikh-Americans, Islamophobia and Racialized Violence"\n

UID:20181024T203000Z-44705@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44705 LAST-MODIFIED:20180905T191035Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44705 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, please contact \;Jyotsna Vaid END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181030T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181030T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Graduate Colloquium Series: An DESCRIPTION:Dong An  | Ph.D. candidate\, Department of Philosophy X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Dong An  | Ph.D. candidate, Department of Philosophy\n

UID:20181030T210000Z-44459@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44459 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T162120Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,372,410/3251_An_headshot.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44459 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,372\,410/3251_An_headshot.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Dong An X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181031T090000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181031T100000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Morning Coffee Hour DESCRIPTION:Ashley Passmore | Assistant Professor\, Department of International StudiesTitle\n "Post-Nationalism and Its Discontents"\n\n In her talk\, Ashley Passmore will discuss what she terms a "post-post-national aesthetic" through a reading of Yael Ronen's play\, The Situation\, which premiered at the Maxim Gorki Theater in Berlin in 2015. The production has all the hallmarks of a post-national narrative: a community of young students\, Jewish and Arab Israelis next to African and Arab Palestinians\, who are learning German in the newly globalized capital. But the students discover profound limitations to the post-national ideal when national identity\, language\, and tribal belonging persist in the classroom\, even as the play visualizes the aesthetics of open borders and multicultural expression through the leitmotifs of parkour and rap. She will show how the play reveals the post-national condition as a shallow\, urban social citizenship with deep political divisions and questions whether the transition to the equanimity of the globalized gaze is impossible to adopt in any other way than as performance. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Ashley Passmore | Assistant Professor, Department of International Studies

Title
\n "Post-Nationalism and Its Discontents"\n

\n In her talk, Ashley Passmore will discuss what she terms a "post-post-national aesthetic" through a reading of Yael Ronen's play, The Situation, which premiered at the Maxim Gorki Theater in Berlin in 2015. The production has all the hallmarks of a post-national narrative: a community of young students, Jewish and Arab Israelis next to African and Arab Palestinians, who are learning German in the newly globalized capital. But the students discover profound limitations to the post-national ideal when national identity, language, and tribal belonging persist in the classroom, even as the play visualizes the aesthetics of open borders and multicultural expression through the leitmotifs of parkour and rap. She will show how the play reveals the post-national condition as a shallow, urban social citizenship with deep political divisions and questions whether the transition to the equanimity of the globalized gaze is impossible to adopt in any other way than as performance.\n

UID:20181031T140000Z-44605@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44605 LAST-MODIFIED:20180910T155823Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/80,101,578,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44605 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/80\,101\,578\,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:MCH X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181106T123000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181106T140000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Medieval Studies Working Group Meeting DESCRIPTION:Medieval Studies Working Group\n Meeting 2 of 3\, Fall 2018\n\n The Medieval Studies Working Group invites the participation of all faculty and graduate students with academic interests in the Middle Ages\, roughly defined as the period 500-1500 CE. Regular meetings normally focus on the airing of work-in-progress or the discussion of published primary or secondary works. The group provides a forum for dialogue about the field of medieval studies and any topic within it\; supports participants' own research with opportunities for constructive feedback\; increases awareness of\, and access to\, interdisciplinary possibilities as we benefit mutually from one another's more specialized interests and expertise\; and continues to develop a sense of community among TAMU's medievalists.\n Convenors: Kathy Torabi\, Noah Peterson\, Caitlin Brenner\, English X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Medieval Studies Working Group

\n Meeting 2 of 3, Fall 2018\n

\n The Medieval Studies Working Group invites the participation of all faculty and graduate students with academic interests in the Middle Ages, roughly defined as the period 500-1500 CE. Regular meetings normally focus on the airing of work-in-progress or the discussion of published primary or secondary works. The group provides a forum for dialogue about the field of medieval studies and any topic within it; supports participants' own research with opportunities for constructive feedback; increases awareness of, and access to, interdisciplinary possibilities as we benefit mutually from one another's more specialized interests and expertise; and continues to develop a sense of community among TAMU's medievalists.
\n Convenors: Kathy Torabi, Noah Peterson, Caitlin Brenner, English

UID:20181106T183000Z-46263@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/46263 LAST-MODIFIED:20180907T162857Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,216,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:46263 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,216\,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Working Group X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Katayoun Torabi
Noah Peterson
END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181106T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181106T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Faculty Colloquium Series DESCRIPTION:Leonardo Cardoso | Department of Performance Studies X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Leonardo Cardoso | Department of Performance Studies\n

UID:20181106T220000Z-44475@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44475 LAST-MODIFIED:20180626T204740Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,578,516/3077_Cardoso.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44475 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,578\,516/3077_Cardoso.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Leonardo Cardoso X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181113T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181113T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Graduate Colloquium Series: Embree DESCRIPTION:Desirae Embree  | Ph.D. candidate\, Department of EnglishTitle\n Private Pleasures\, Public Provocations: 'Dyke Porn' and Lesbian Sexual Entertainment in the Late 20th Century\nAbstract\n "Private Pleasures\, Public Provocations: 'Dyke Porn' and Lesbian Sexual Entertainment in the Late 20th Century" is a study of an under-examined moment in both lesbian history and the history of pornography in which queer women capitalized on both existing queer media cultures and new media technologies in order to create sexual entertainment for their own community. Spanning a variety of media technologies and practices including live performance\, print\, video\, phone hotlines\, voicemail\, letter-writing\, photography\, and more\, this project seeks to counter narratives of lesbian history that emphasize the political over the erotic\, arguing that lesbian sexual desire and practice were the engine for unprecedented lesbian cultural productivity and entrepreneurship.  X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Desirae Embree  | Ph.D. candidate, Department of English

Title
\n Private Pleasures, Public Provocations: 'Dyke Porn' and Lesbian Sexual Entertainment in the Late 20th Century\n

Abstract
\n "Private Pleasures, Public Provocations: 'Dyke Porn' and Lesbian Sexual Entertainment in the Late 20th Century" is a study of an under-examined moment in both lesbian history and the history of pornography in which queer women capitalized on both existing queer media cultures and new media technologies in order to create sexual entertainment for their own community. Spanning a variety of media technologies and practices including live performance, print, video, phone hotlines, voicemail, letter-writing, photography, and more, this project seeks to counter narratives of lesbian history that emphasize the political over the erotic, arguing that lesbian sexual desire and practice were the engine for unprecedented lesbian cultural productivity and entrepreneurship. \n

UID:20181113T220000Z-44462@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44462 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T162258Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,2400,3200/3252_Headshot_2.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44462 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,2400\,3200/3252_Headshot_2.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Desirae Embree X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181114T090000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181114T100000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Morning Coffee Hour DESCRIPTION:Angela Hudson| Professor\, Department of History\nTitle\n "'Indian Doctresses' in the 19th-century United States"AbstractThis project focuses on "Indian doctresses" who operated at the intersection of 19th-century cultural values and beliefs regarding womanhood\, medicine\, and American Indians. Not all of the women under consideration were of Native ancestry\, but they all mobilized widespread ideas about indigeneity to seek entrepreneurial success as healers. Investigating the history of this occupation provides a window onto the ways that women from a wide variety of backgrounds fused care-giving skills with popular assumptions about American Indians to make a living. Central among those assumptions were two common associations: one linking indigenous knowledge to the natural world and one linking Native women to transgressive motherhood. Although they were real women\, working in the cities of the 19th-century United States\, Indian doctresses thus also became useful symbolic figures upon whom changing conceptions of race\, gender\, and class could be projected. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Angela Hudson| Professor, Department of History\n

Title
\n "'Indian Doctresses' in the 19th-century United States"

Abstract
This project focuses on "Indian doctresses" who operated at the intersection of 19th-century cultural values and beliefs regarding womanhood, medicine, and American Indians. Not all of the women under consideration were of Native ancestry, but they all mobilized widespread ideas about indigeneity to seek entrepreneurial success as healers. Investigating the history of this occupation provides a window onto the ways that women from a wide variety of backgrounds fused care-giving skills with popular assumptions about American Indians to make a living. Central among those assumptions were two common associations: one linking indigenous knowledge to the natural world and one linking Native women to transgressive motherhood. Although they were real women, working in the cities of the 19th-century United States, Indian doctresses thus also became useful symbolic figures upon whom changing conceptions of race, gender, and class could be projected.\n

UID:20181114T150000Z-44606@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44606 LAST-MODIFIED:20180705T185841Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/80,109,571,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44606 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/80\,109\,571\,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:MCH X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181115T093000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181115T173000 LOCATION:Liberal Arts and Arts &\; Humanities Building GEO:30.617684;-96.337971 SUMMARY:"It's Alive!": Frankenstein's Monster 200 Years Later DESCRIPTION:The "It's Alive!" Symposium is part of a week of programming\, November 12-18\, at TAMU\, which includes a special exhibit in Cushing Library\, an undergraduate poster session\, and a film screening at the Queen Theatre in Bryan. Our events join the international Frankenreads project\, a global celebration of the 200th anniversary of Shelley's Frankenstein. The Symposium and related programming are largely organized by graduate students in the Department of English with generous sponsorship from the Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research\, the Department of English\, the Center of Digital Humanities Research\, the New Modern British Studies Working Group\, IntersXtions\, the John and Sara Lindsey Chair of Liberal Arts\, the Health Humanities Laboratory\, and LAUNCH. All events are free and open to the public. For more information\, please see our website http://frankenreads.sites.tamu.edu/.\n  \n\n The Call for Papers information can be found under "Related Content". X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n The "It's Alive!" Symposium is part of a week of programming, November 12-18, at TAMU, which includes a special exhibit in Cushing Library, an undergraduate poster session, and a film screening at the Queen Theatre in Bryan. Our events join the international Frankenreads project, a global celebration of the 200th anniversary of Shelley's Frankenstein. The Symposium and related programming are largely organized by graduate students in the Department of English with generous sponsorship from the Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research, the Department of English, the Center of Digital Humanities Research, the New Modern British Studies Working Group, IntersXtions, the John and Sara Lindsey Chair of Liberal Arts, the Health Humanities Laboratory, and LAUNCH. All events are free and open to the public. For more information, please see our website http://frankenreads.sites.tamu.edu/.

\n  \n

\n The Call for Papers information can be found under "Related Content".\n

UID:20181115T153000Z-45797@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/45797 LAST-MODIFIED:20180827T174012Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,300,300/3218_frankenreads-logo-square-notext-300x300.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:45797 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,300\,300/3218_frankenreads-logo-square-notext-300x300.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Frankenreads END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181116T093000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181116T133000 LOCATION:Liberal Arts and Arts &\; Humanities Building GEO:30.617684;-96.337971 SUMMARY:"It's Alive!": Frankenstein's Monster 200 Years Later DESCRIPTION:The "It's Alive!" Symposium is part of a week of programming\, November 12-18\, at TAMU\, which includes a special exhibit in Cushing Library\, an undergraduate poster session\, and a film screening at the Queen Theatre in Bryan. Our events join the international Frankenreads project\, a global celebration of the 200th anniversary of Shelley's Frankenstein. The Symposium and related programming are largely organized by graduate students in the Department of English with generous sponsorship from the Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research\, the Department of English\, the Center of Digital Humanities Research\, the New Modern British Studies Working Group\, IntersXtions\, the John and Sara Lindsey Chair of Liberal Arts\, the Health Humanities Laboratory\, and LAUNCH. All events are free and open to the public. For more information\, please see our website http://frankenreads.sites.tamu.edu/.\n  \n\n The Call for Papers can be found under "Related Content". X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n The "It's Alive!" Symposium is part of a week of programming, November 12-18, at TAMU, which includes a special exhibit in Cushing Library, an undergraduate poster session, and a film screening at the Queen Theatre in Bryan. Our events join the international Frankenreads project, a global celebration of the 200th anniversary of Shelley's Frankenstein. The Symposium and related programming are largely organized by graduate students in the Department of English with generous sponsorship from the Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research, the Department of English, the Center of Digital Humanities Research, the New Modern British Studies Working Group, IntersXtions, the John and Sara Lindsey Chair of Liberal Arts, the Health Humanities Laboratory, and LAUNCH. All events are free and open to the public. For more information, please see our website http://frankenreads.sites.tamu.edu/.

\n  \n

\n The Call for Papers can be found under "Related Content".\n

UID:20181116T153000Z-45796@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/45796 LAST-MODIFIED:20180827T174032Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,300,300/3218_frankenreads-logo-square-notext-300x300.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:45796 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,300\,300/3218_frankenreads-logo-square-notext-300x300.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Frankenreads END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20181203T123000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20181203T140000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Medieval Studies Working Group Meeting DESCRIPTION:Medieval Studies Working Group\n Meeting 3 of 3\, Fall 2018\n\n The Medieval Studies Working Group invites the participation of all faculty and graduate students with academic interests in the Middle Ages\, roughly defined as the period 500-1500 CE. Regular meetings normally focus on the airing of work-in-progress or the discussion of published primary or secondary works. The group provides a forum for dialogue about the field of medieval studies and any topic within it\; supports participants' own research with opportunities for constructive feedback\; increases awareness of\, and access to\, interdisciplinary possibilities as we benefit mutually from one another's more specialized interests and expertise\; and continues to develop a sense of community among TAMU's medievalists.\n Convenors: Kathy Torabi\, Noah Peterson\, Caitlin Brenner\, English X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Medieval Studies Working Group

\n Meeting 3 of 3, Fall 2018\n

\n The Medieval Studies Working Group invites the participation of all faculty and graduate students with academic interests in the Middle Ages, roughly defined as the period 500-1500 CE. Regular meetings normally focus on the airing of work-in-progress or the discussion of published primary or secondary works. The group provides a forum for dialogue about the field of medieval studies and any topic within it; supports participants' own research with opportunities for constructive feedback; increases awareness of, and access to, interdisciplinary possibilities as we benefit mutually from one another's more specialized interests and expertise; and continues to develop a sense of community among TAMU's medievalists.
\n Convenors: Kathy Torabi, Noah Peterson, Caitlin Brenner, English

UID:20181203T183000Z-46265@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/46265 LAST-MODIFIED:20180907T162811Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,216,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:46265 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,216\,216/2104_gc_workinggroups.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Working Groups X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Katayoun Torabi
Noah Peterson
END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190129T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190129T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Faculty Colloquium Series DESCRIPTION:Dinah Hannaford | Department of International Studies X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Dinah Hannaford | Department of International Studies\n

UID:20190129T220000Z-44476@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44476 LAST-MODIFIED:20180626T205055Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,289,240/3078_Hannaford.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44476 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,289\,240/3078_Hannaford.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Dinah Hannaford X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;VALUE=DATE:20190131 DTEND;VALUE=DATE:20190201 LOCATION:Bob Bullock State Museum SUMMARY:Reverberations of Memory\, Violence\, and History: The Centennial of the 1919 Canales Investigation DESCRIPTION:Reverberations of Memory\, Violence\, and History: The Centennial of the 1919 Canales Investigation is a conference that places a traumatic event in our nation's history at the center of a public conversation. It shows that violence not only exemplified deep socio-economic transformations at a particular historical moment\; it underscores community responses to such violence and traces its long-lasting legacy. This conference will mark the centennial of the Canales Investigation of 1919\, which exposed the violence committed by the Texas Rangers during the previous decade against the predominantly Texas Mexican border community. This is a two-day conference about the 1919 Canales Investigation and its legacies. The research presented by national and international experts in this field will be further expanded and featured in a scholarly edited volume prefaced by a historical introduction written and edited by NEH PI and Associate Professor of History Texas A&M\, Sonia Hernandez and NEH Co-PI and Professor of English at UT-Austin\, John Moran Gonzalez.\n\n Some of the worst racial violence in United States history took place along the United States-Mexican borderlands\, specifically in south Texas from 1910 to 1919. The dead included women and men\, the aged and the young\, long-time residents and recent arrivals. They were killed by strangers\, sometimes by neighbors\, some by vigilantes and other times at the hands of local law enforcement officers or members of the state's elite patrol\, the Texas Rangers.  Reverberations of Memory\, Violence\, and History reveals how these events that transpired along our nation's borders\, long viewed as peripheral\, were all but peripheral. What happened along the southern border was reflective of national processes involving ideologies about citizenship and civil rights\, themes that have received scholarly attention from a variety of scholars who have participated in Glasscock Humanities Center-sponsored events.\n\n This conference features cutting edge research on the topic of violence as well as the legacies for the Mexican American civil rights and larger civil rights movement\, that as the conference will show took shape much earlier than the 1960s and 1970s. This is a timely topic as well as it showcases the importance of borderlands scholarship and how this field has grown\; it is an area of scholarship that is among the fastest growing in the Department of History at TAMU\; it will help increase the national standing of this department as a leader in humanities research on timely and urgent topics such as border issues\, immigration\, citizenship\, violence\, and civil rights.  X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n Reverberations of Memory, Violence, and History: The Centennial of the 1919 Canales Investigation is a conference that places a traumatic event in our nation's history at the center of a public conversation. It shows that violence not only exemplified deep socio-economic transformations at a particular historical moment; it underscores community responses to such violence and traces its long-lasting legacy. This conference will mark the centennial of the Canales Investigation of 1919, which exposed the violence committed by the Texas Rangers during the previous decade against the predominantly Texas Mexican border community. This is a two-day conference about the 1919 Canales Investigation and its legacies. The research presented by national and international experts in this field will be further expanded and featured in a scholarly edited volume prefaced by a historical introduction written and edited by NEH PI and Associate Professor of History Texas A&M, Sonia Hernandez and NEH Co-PI and Professor of English at UT-Austin, John Moran Gonzalez.\n


\n Some of the worst racial violence in United States history took place along the United States-Mexican borderlands, specifically in south Texas from 1910 to 1919. The dead included women and men, the aged and the young, long-time residents and recent arrivals. They were killed by strangers, sometimes by neighbors, some by vigilantes and other times at the hands of local law enforcement officers or members of the state's elite patrol, the Texas Rangers.  Reverberations of Memory, Violence, and History reveals how these events that transpired along our nation's borders, long viewed as peripheral, were all but peripheral. What happened along the southern border was reflective of national processes involving ideologies about citizenship and civil rights, themes that have received scholarly attention from a variety of scholars who have participated in Glasscock Humanities Center-sponsored events.\n

\n This conference features cutting edge research on the topic of violence as well as the legacies for the Mexican American civil rights and larger civil rights movement, that as the conference will show took shape much earlier than the 1960s and 1970s. This is a timely topic as well as it showcases the importance of borderlands scholarship and how this field has grown; it is an area of scholarship that is among the fastest growing in the Department of History at TAMU; it will help increase the national standing of this department as a leader in humanities research on timely and urgent topics such as border issues, immigration, citizenship, violence, and civil rights. \n

UID:20190131T060000Z-44078@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44078 LAST-MODIFIED:20180529T153458Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44078 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-ALL-DAY:1 X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, contact Dr. Sonia Hernandez. END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;VALUE=DATE:20190201 DTEND;VALUE=DATE:20190202 LOCATION:Bob Bullock State Museum SUMMARY:Reverberations of Memory\, Violence\, and History: The Centennial of the 1919 Canales Investigation DESCRIPTION:Reverberations of Memory\, Violence\, and History: The Centennial of the 1919 Canales Investigation is a conference that places a traumatic event in our nation's history at the center of a public conversation. It shows that violence not only exemplified deep socio-economic transformations at a particular historical moment\; it underscores community responses to such violence and traces its long-lasting legacy. This conference will mark the centennial of the Canales Investigation of 1919\, which exposed the violence committed by the Texas Rangers during the previous decade against the predominantly Texas Mexican border community. This is a two-day conference about the 1919 Canales Investigation and its legacies. The research presented by national and international experts in this field will be further expanded and featured in a scholarly edited volume prefaced by a historical introduction written and edited by NEH PI and Associate Professor of History Texas A&M\, Sonia Hernandez and NEH Co-PI and Professor of English at UT-Austin\, John Moran Gonzalez.\n\n Some of the worst racial violence in United States history took place along the United States-Mexican borderlands\, specifically in south Texas from 1910 to 1919. The dead included women and men\, the aged and the young\, long-time residents and recent arrivals. They were killed by strangers\, sometimes by neighbors\, some by vigilantes and other times at the hands of local law enforcement officers or members of the state's elite patrol\, the Texas Rangers.  Reverberations of Memory\, Violence\, and History reveals how these events that transpired along our nation's borders\, long viewed as peripheral\, were all but peripheral. What happened along the southern border was reflective of national processes involving ideologies about citizenship and civil rights\, themes that have received scholarly attention from a variety of scholars who have participated in Glasscock Humanities Center-sponsored events.\n\n This conference features cutting edge research on the topic of violence as well as the legacies for the Mexican American civil rights and larger civil rights movement\, that as the conference will show took shape much earlier than the 1960s and 1970s. This is a timely topic as well as it showcases the importance of borderlands scholarship and how this field has grown\; it is an area of scholarship that is among the fastest growing in the Department of History at TAMU\; it will help increase the national standing of this department as a leader in humanities research on timely and urgent topics such as border issues\, immigration\, citizenship\, violence\, and civil rights.  X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n Reverberations of Memory, Violence, and History: The Centennial of the 1919 Canales Investigation is a conference that places a traumatic event in our nation's history at the center of a public conversation. It shows that violence not only exemplified deep socio-economic transformations at a particular historical moment; it underscores community responses to such violence and traces its long-lasting legacy. This conference will mark the centennial of the Canales Investigation of 1919, which exposed the violence committed by the Texas Rangers during the previous decade against the predominantly Texas Mexican border community. This is a two-day conference about the 1919 Canales Investigation and its legacies. The research presented by national and international experts in this field will be further expanded and featured in a scholarly edited volume prefaced by a historical introduction written and edited by NEH PI and Associate Professor of History Texas A&M, Sonia Hernandez and NEH Co-PI and Professor of English at UT-Austin, John Moran Gonzalez.\n


\n Some of the worst racial violence in United States history took place along the United States-Mexican borderlands, specifically in south Texas from 1910 to 1919. The dead included women and men, the aged and the young, long-time residents and recent arrivals. They were killed by strangers, sometimes by neighbors, some by vigilantes and other times at the hands of local law enforcement officers or members of the state's elite patrol, the Texas Rangers.  Reverberations of Memory, Violence, and History reveals how these events that transpired along our nation's borders, long viewed as peripheral, were all but peripheral. What happened along the southern border was reflective of national processes involving ideologies about citizenship and civil rights, themes that have received scholarly attention from a variety of scholars who have participated in Glasscock Humanities Center-sponsored events.\n

\n This conference features cutting edge research on the topic of violence as well as the legacies for the Mexican American civil rights and larger civil rights movement, that as the conference will show took shape much earlier than the 1960s and 1970s. This is a timely topic as well as it showcases the importance of borderlands scholarship and how this field has grown; it is an area of scholarship that is among the fastest growing in the Department of History at TAMU; it will help increase the national standing of this department as a leader in humanities research on timely and urgent topics such as border issues, immigration, citizenship, violence, and civil rights. \n

UID:20190201T060000Z-44078@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44078 LAST-MODIFIED:20180529T153458Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44078 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-ALL-DAY:1 X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, contact Dr. Sonia Hernandez. END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190205T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190205T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Graduate Colloquium Series DESCRIPTION:Dalitso Ruwe  | Ph.D. candidate\, Department of Philosophy\n\n  \nTitle \n Black Immortal Child: Frederick Douglass and American Slavery X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Dalitso Ruwe  | Ph.D. candidate, Department of Philosophy\n

\n  \n

Title 
\n Black Immortal Child: Frederick Douglass and American Slavery\n

UID:20190205T220000Z-44464@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44464 LAST-MODIFIED:20180626T200125Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,558,557/3072_headshot.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44464 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,558\,557/3072_headshot.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Dalitso Ruwe X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190206T090000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190206T100000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Morning Coffee Hour DESCRIPTION:Marian Eide| Associate Professor\, Department of EnglishTitle\n "Modernist Magdalenes and Spinster Sisters"Abstract \n This project presents a counter-narrative for the spinster\, aiming to correct a prevalent\, reviled image of unmarried women specifically in the Modernist period between 1885 and 1945 when transatlantic political reform made independent living more widely available to women in the across the English-speaking world. Literatures of this period both reflect on and produce imagined lives for single women. Considering the nonnormative sexual and social worlds of economically independent women\, serial monogamists\, "fallen" women\, celibates\, lesbians\, and "failed" heterosexuals\, all of whom appear as spinsters in modernist fiction\, allows readers a subtler understanding of women's thought and experience during a transitional period in gender history. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Marian Eide| Associate Professor, Department of English

Title
\n "Modernist Magdalenes and Spinster Sisters"

Abstract 
\n This project presents a counter-narrative for the spinster, aiming to correct a prevalent, reviled image of unmarried women specifically in the Modernist period between 1885 and 1945 when transatlantic political reform made independent living more widely available to women in the across the English-speaking world. Literatures of this period both reflect on and produce imagined lives for single women. Considering the nonnormative sexual and social worlds of economically independent women, serial monogamists, "fallen" women, celibates, lesbians, and "failed" heterosexuals, all of whom appear as spinsters in modernist fiction, allows readers a subtler understanding of women's thought and experience during a transitional period in gender history.\n

UID:20190206T150000Z-44607@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44607 LAST-MODIFIED:20180705T190150Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/90,119,571,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44607 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/90\,119\,571\,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:MCH X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190207T100000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190207T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:On Heidegger's National Humanism: A Symposium on Derrida's Lost Geschlecht III (Day 1) DESCRIPTION:Day 1 of 2\n\n "On Heidegger's National Humanism: A Symposium on Derrida's Lost Geschlecht III"\n\n  \n\n More information to come. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n Day 1 of 2\n

\n "On Heidegger's National Humanism: A Symposium on Derrida's Lost Geschlecht III"\n

\n  \n

\n More information to come.\n

UID:20190207T160000Z-38210@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/38210 LAST-MODIFIED:20180504T134704Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:38210 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Dr. Adam Rosenthal | \;Assistant Professor\, Department of International Studies
X-LIVEWHALE-SUMMARY:Day 1 of 2
\nCo-sponsored symposium END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190208T100000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190208T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:On Heidegger's National Humanism: A Symposium on Derrida's Lost Geschlecht III (Day 2) DESCRIPTION:Day 2 of 2\n\n "On Heidegger's National Humanism: A Symposium on Derrida's Lost Geschlecht III"\n\n  \n\n More information to come. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

\n Day 2 of 2\n

\n "On Heidegger's National Humanism: A Symposium on Derrida's Lost Geschlecht III"\n

\n  \n

\n More information to come.\n

UID:20190208T160000Z-43716@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/43716 LAST-MODIFIED:20180504T134714Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:43716 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Dr. Adam Rosenthal \;| \;Assistant Professor\, Department of International Studies X-LIVEWHALE-SUMMARY:Day 2 of 2
\nCo-sponsored symposium END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190212T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190212T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Faculty Colloquium Series DESCRIPTION:Olga Dror | Department of History X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Olga Dror | Department of History

UID:20190212T220000Z-44477@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44477 LAST-MODIFIED:20180626T205236Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,200,298/3079_Dror.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44477 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,200\,298/3079_Dror.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Olga Dror X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190219T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190219T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Graduate Colloquium Series: Stover DESCRIPTION:Deanna Stover  | Ph.D. candidate\, Department of English X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Deanna Stover  | Ph.D. candidate, Department of English\n

UID:20190219T220000Z-44465@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44465 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T162547Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,375,347/3248_book_edges_circular.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44465 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,375\,347/3248_book_edges_circular.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Graduate Colloquium: Deanna Stover X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190220T090000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190220T100000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Morning Coffee Hour DESCRIPTION:Hoi-eun Kim| Associate Professor\, Department of History\nTitle \n "Disaggregating 'Japanese' Doctors in Colonial Korea: A Preliminary Prosopographical Analysis"\nAbstract\n Japan's colonization of Korea from 1910 to 1945 is often characterized by its fine-toothed organization of colonial bureaucrats that regulated every aspect of the lives of its twenty million colonial subjects. The role of Japanese medical doctors is also understood in this light of colonial micro-management. What is problematic though is that this broad depiction of Japanese doctors as quintessential instruments of colonial biopolitics is made only with a study of a handful of exemplary cases that can be conveniently pigeonholed into a stereotypical image of colonial medicine and its practitioners. In this project\, Kim analyzes prosopographical features of Japanese doctors as a whole\, with a view to significantly advancing our understanding of the nature of medical science in the development and management of Japan's most significant colony. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Hoi-eun Kim| Associate Professor, Department of History\n

Title 
\n "Disaggregating 'Japanese' Doctors in Colonial Korea: A Preliminary Prosopographical Analysis"\n

Abstract
\n Japan's colonization of Korea from 1910 to 1945 is often characterized by its fine-toothed organization of colonial bureaucrats that regulated every aspect of the lives of its twenty million colonial subjects. The role of Japanese medical doctors is also understood in this light of colonial micro-management. What is problematic though is that this broad depiction of Japanese doctors as quintessential instruments of colonial biopolitics is made only with a study of a handful of exemplary cases that can be conveniently pigeonholed into a stereotypical image of colonial medicine and its practitioners. In this project, Kim analyzes prosopographical features of Japanese doctors as a whole, with a view to significantly advancing our understanding of the nature of medical science in the development and management of Japan's most significant colony.\n

UID:20190220T150000Z-44608@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44608 LAST-MODIFIED:20180705T190440Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/84,109,575,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44608 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/84\,109\,575\,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:MCH X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;VALUE=DATE:20190222 DTEND;VALUE=DATE:20190223 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Hermeneutics\, the Humanities\, and the Future of Interpretation DESCRIPTION:Symposium/Small Conference X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Symposium/Small Conference

UID:20190222T060000Z-46046@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/46046 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T171736Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:46046 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-ALL-DAY:1 X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Kristi Sweet END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;VALUE=DATE:20190223 DTEND;VALUE=DATE:20190224 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Hermeneutics\, the Humanities\, and the Future of Interpretation DESCRIPTION:Symposium/Small Conference X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Symposium/Small Conference

UID:20190223T060000Z-46046@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/46046 LAST-MODIFIED:20180831T171736Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:46046 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-ALL-DAY:1 X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Kristi Sweet END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190226T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190226T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Faculty Colloquium Series DESCRIPTION:Maria Irene Moyna | Department of Hispanic Studies X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Maria Irene Moyna | Department of Hispanic Studies\n

UID:20190226T220000Z-44478@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44478 LAST-MODIFIED:20180626T205415Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,0,960,1280/3080_Moyna.JPG X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44478 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,0\,960\,1280/3080_Moyna.JPG X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Maria Irene Moyna X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190228T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190228T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:"'How Does It Feel To Be a Problem?" Being Young and Muslim in America\, 10 Years On DESCRIPTION:Title"How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?" Being Young and Muslim in America\, 10 Years On\nDescriptionBeing young and Muslim in the United States has only gotten more complicated since the terrorist attacks of 2001. Ten years ago\, author Moustafa Bayoumi wrote an award-winning book describing the challenges these young people were facing in the United States. Now\, more than a decade later\, a time for reflection has come. In this lecture\, Bayoumi will discuss his research on young Muslim Americans over the years\, including the new challenges confronting them during the Trump administration.Professor Moustafa Bayoumi | Ph. D Columbia University\, \n\n Professor Moustafa Bayoumi is a distinguished scholar in the field of Arab American studies who earned a Ph.D from Columbia University in English and Comparative Literature in 1998\, to deliver a notable lecture at Texas A&M University in spring 2019. Professor Bayoumi won an American Book Award and the Arab American Book Award for Non-Fiction for How Does It Feel To Be a Problem\, Being Young and Arab in America (Penguin)\, his 2008 account of the lives of young Arab Americans in Brooklyn after September 11. He won a second Arab American Book Award in 2016 for This Muslim American Life: Dispatches from the War on Terror (NYU)\, which was also chosen as a Best Book of 2015 by The Progressive magazine. He is also the co-editor of The Edward Said Reader (Vintage) and editor of Midnight on the Mavi Marmara: The Attack on the Gaza Freedom Flotilla and How It Changed the Course of the Israel/Palestine Conflict (O/R Books & Haymarket Books).\n\n Professor Bayoumi is a Professor of English at Brooklyn College\, City University of New York.\n Building on his scholarly work on Islamic diasporas and Arab American studies\, Professor Bayoumi's interdisciplinary research engages with the intersections of race\, ethnicity\, and religion in ways that resonate with ongoing political and cultural work around inclusion\, immigration\, Islamophobia\, and U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. These questions resonate profoundly for the Texas A&M community\, which is being impacted by new immigration policies as severely as any other university in the country (http://www.businessinsider.com/colleges-potentially-most-affected-trump-immigration-ban-2017-2). Professor Bayoumi speaks and writes widely about these issues for a broad audience as a columnist for The Guardian and in his writing which has appeared in The New York Times Magazine\, New York Magazine\, The National\, CNN.com\, The London Review of Books\, The Nation\, The Chronicle of Higher Education\, and The Progressive\, among other places. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Title
"How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?" Being Young and Muslim in America, 10 Years On\n

Description
Being young and Muslim in the United States has only gotten more complicated since the terrorist attacks of 2001. Ten years ago, author Moustafa Bayoumi wrote an award-winning book describing the challenges these young people were facing in the United States. Now, more than a decade later, a time for reflection has come. In this lecture, Bayoumi will discuss his research on young Muslim Americans over the years, including the new challenges confronting them during the Trump administration.

Professor Moustafa Bayoumi | Ph. D Columbia University, \n

\n Professor Moustafa Bayoumi is a distinguished scholar in the field of Arab American studies who earned a Ph.D from Columbia University in English and Comparative Literature in 1998, to deliver a notable lecture at Texas A&M University in spring 2019. Professor Bayoumi won an American Book Award and the Arab American Book Award for Non-Fiction for How Does It Feel To Be a Problem, Being Young and Arab in America (Penguin), his 2008 account of the lives of young Arab Americans in Brooklyn after September 11. He won a second Arab American Book Award in 2016 for This Muslim American Life: Dispatches from the War on Terror (NYU), which was also chosen as a Best Book of 2015 by The Progressive magazine. He is also the co-editor of The Edward Said Reader (Vintage) and editor of Midnight on the Mavi Marmara: The Attack on the Gaza Freedom Flotilla and How It Changed the Course of the Israel/Palestine Conflict (O/R Books & Haymarket Books).\n

\n Professor Bayoumi is a Professor of English at Brooklyn College, City University of New York.
\n Building on his scholarly work on Islamic diasporas and Arab American studies, Professor Bayoumi's interdisciplinary research engages with the intersections of race, ethnicity, and religion in ways that resonate with ongoing political and cultural work around inclusion, immigration, Islamophobia, and U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. These questions resonate profoundly for the Texas A&M community, which is being impacted by new immigration policies as severely as any other university in the country (http://www.businessinsider.com/colleges-potentially-most-affected-trump-immigration-ban-2017-2). Professor Bayoumi speaks and writes widely about these issues for a broad audience as a columnist for The Guardian and in his writing which has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, New York Magazine, The National, CNN.com, The London Review of Books, The Nation, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and The Progressive, among other places.\n

UID:20190228T220000Z-44075@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44075 LAST-MODIFIED:20180713T125422Z X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44075 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:For more information\, contact Dr. Ira Dworkin. END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190305T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190305T170000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Graduate Colloquium Series DESCRIPTION:Michael Morris | Ph.D. candidate\, Department of HistoryTitleAbstract\n Morris's research examines the role played by the senior Marine headquarters in the northern five provinces of South Vietnam between 1965 and 1971.  This contested region featured the bloodiest fighting with the North Vietnamese Army\, the strongest Viet Cong infrastructure\, the disputed border with North Vietnam\, key portions of the Ho Chi Minh Trail\, and the political and economic prizes of Hue and Da Nang.  This project evaluates corps-level combat and pacification operations against both regular and insurgent opponents in a critical part of America's most divisive foreign war.  Specifically\, the study seeks new insights into this confusing conflict by exploring critical functions such as command relations\, intelligence processes\, logistic support\, and contingency plans.  X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Michael Morris | Ph.D. candidate, Department of History

Title

Abstract
\n Morris's research examines the role played by the senior Marine headquarters in the northern five provinces of South Vietnam between 1965 and 1971.  This contested region featured the bloodiest fighting with the North Vietnamese Army, the strongest Viet Cong infrastructure, the disputed border with North Vietnam, key portions of the Ho Chi Minh Trail, and the political and economic prizes of Hue and Da Nang.  This project evaluates corps-level combat and pacification operations against both regular and insurgent opponents in a critical part of America's most divisive foreign war.  Specifically, the study seeks new insights into this confusing conflict by exploring critical functions such as command relations, intelligence processes, logistic support, and contingency plans. \n

UID:20190305T220000Z-44468@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44468 LAST-MODIFIED:20180626T201034Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0,58,847,906/3073_Morris.JPG X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44468 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/0\,58\,847\,906/3073_Morris.JPG X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:Michael Morris X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center \; END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20190306T090000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20190306T100000 LOCATION:Melbern G. Glasscock Building GEO:30.617332;-96.338489 SUMMARY:Morning Coffee Hour DESCRIPTION:Ira Dworkin| Assistant Professor\, Department of English\nTitle \n "Nicholas Said\, the Civil War\, and the Emergence of African American Narrative"Abstract\n This project examines the literary career of Nicholas Said\, a Muslim man from Bornu (near Lake Chad in present-day northeastern Nigeria)\, who was enslaved in Africa\, Europe\, and Asia before arriving in the United States in 1860 as a freed person\, where he volunteered for the 55th Massachusetts Regiment during the Civil War. This paper attempts to reconcile the popular appeal of Said's Americanness\, which facilitated the publication of his autobiography in the Atlantic Monthly in 1867\, with his text which has little to say about his Civil War service. Said's disidentification with the United States opens up space for him to inscribe himself more substantively as an African Muslim subject\, which in turn productively disrupts the established formulations of nineteenth-century American literature. X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Ira Dworkin| Assistant Professor, Department of English\n

Title 
\n "Nicholas Said, the Civil War, and the Emergence of African American Narrative"

Abstract
\n This project examines the literary career of Nicholas Said, a Muslim man from Bornu (near Lake Chad in present-day northeastern Nigeria), who was enslaved in Africa, Europe, and Asia before arriving in the United States in 1860 as a freed person, where he volunteered for the 55th Massachusetts Regiment during the Civil War. This paper attempts to reconcile the popular appeal of Said's Americanness, which facilitated the publication of his autobiography in the Atlantic Monthly in 1867, with his text which has little to say about his Civil War service. Said's disidentification with the United States opens up space for him to inscribe himself more substantively as an African Muslim subject, which in turn productively disrupts the established formulations of nineteenth-century American literature.\n

UID:20190306T150000Z-44609@calendar.tamu.edu URL:http://calendar.tamu.edu/glasscockcenter/#!view/event/event_id/44609 LAST-MODIFIED:20180705T190747Z ATTACH:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/88,116,571,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-TYPE:events X-LIVEWHALE-ID:44609 X-LIVEWHALE-TIMEZONE:America/Chicago X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE:https://calendar.tamu.edu/live/image/gid/95/width/80/height/80/crop/1/src_region/88\,116\,571\,600/1880_coffeemug.jpg X-LIVEWHALE-IMAGE-CAPTION:MCH X-LIVEWHALE-CONTACT-INFO:Glasscock Center END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR